Edward Eggleston

Edward Eggleston, (1837, Vevay, Ind., U.S.—died 1902 N.Y.), clergyman, novelist, and historian who realistically portrayed various sections of the U.S. in such books as The Hoosier School-Master. By the age of 19, Eggleston had become an itinerant preacher, but circuit riding broke his health. He held various pastorates, serving from 1874 to 1879 in Brooklyn; he was an editor of the juvenile paper, Little Corporal (1866–67), the National Sunday School Teacher (1867–73), and other periodicals. In all of his work he sought to write with “photographic exactness” of the real West. The most popular of his books for adults was The Hoosier School-Master (1871), a vivid study of backwoods Indiana. His other novels include The End of the World (1872), The Mystery of Metropolisville (1873), The Circuit Rider: A Tale of the Heroic Age(1874), Roxy (1878), and The Graysons (1888). His later novels and children’s books are considered less significant. After a trip to Europe in 1879 he turned to the writing of history. His Beginners of a Nation(1896) and Transit of Civilization from England to America (1900) contributed to the growth of social history.

A First Book in American History

A First Book in American History

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The main peculiarity of the present book is that it aims to teach children the history of the country by making them acquainted with some of the most illustrious actors in it. A child is interested, above all, in persons. Biography is for him the natural door into history. The order of events in a nation's life is somewhat above the reach of younger pupils, but the course of human life and the personal achievements of an individual are intelligible and delightful.

In teaching younger pupils by means of biography, which is the very alphabet of history, we are following a sound principle often forgotten, that primary education should be pursued along the line of the least resistance.

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The End Of The World

The End Of The World

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"I don't believe that you'd care a cent if she did marry a Dutchman! She might as well as to marry some white folks I know."

Samuel Anderson made no reply. It would be of no use to reply. Shrews are tamed only by silence. Anderson had long since learned that the little shred of influence which remained to him in his own house would disappear whenever his teeth were no longer able to shut his tongue securely in.

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