Yellow Line Art Books
Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci

Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci

Printed: 29.99 $eBook: 5.99 $

Leonardo Da Vinci, Born on April 15, 1452, in Vinci, Italy, Leonardo da Vinci was concerned with the laws of science and nature, which greatly informed his work as a painter, sculptor, inventor and draftsmen. His ideas and body of work—which includes "Virgin of the Rocks," "The Last Supper," "Leda and the Swan" and "Mona Lisa"—have influenced countless artists and made da Vinci a leading light of the Italian Renaissance.

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Byzantine Churches in Constantinople

Byzantine Churches in Constantinople

Printed: 19.99 $eBook: 4.99 $

This volume is a sequel to the work I published, several years ago, under the title, Byzantine Constantinople: the Walls of the City, and adjoining Historical Sites. In that work the city was viewed, mainly, as the citadel of the Roman Empire in the East, and the bulwark of civilization for more than a thousand years. But the city of Constantine was not only a mighty fortress. It was, moreover, the centre of a great religious community, which elaborated dogmas, fostered forms of piety, and controlled an ecclesiastical administration that have left a profound impression upon the thought and life of mankind. New Rome was a Holy City. It was crowded with churches, hallowed, it was believed, by the remains of the apostles, prophets, saints, and martyrs of the Catholic Church; shrines at which men gathered to worship, from near and far, as before the gates of heaven.

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Kultur in Cartoons

Kultur in Cartoons

Printed: 11.99 $eBook: 3.99 $

When his cartoons began to reach America toward the end of 1916 this country was neutral. It is with peculiar satisfaction, therefore, that I base this brief foreword upon press extracts published prior to America’s participation in the war. If it were possible to discover today an individual who was entirely ignorant as to the causes and conduct of the war, he would, after an inspection of a hundred or more of these cartoons, probably utter his conviction somewhat as follows:
“I do not believe that these drawings have the slightest relation to the truth; I do not believe that it is possible for such things to happen in the twenti-eth century.”

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A History of Art for Beginners and Students

A History of Art for Beginners and Students

Printed: 14.99 $eBook: 2.99 $
Author:
Series: Yellow Line Art Books, Book 0
Genres: Academics, Art Books

ARCHITECTURE seems to me to be the most wonderful of all the arts. We may not love it as much as others, when we are young perhaps we cannot do so, because it is so great and so grand; but at any time of life one can see that in Architecture some of the most marvellous achievements of men are displayed. The principal reason for saying this is that Architecture is not an imitative art, like Painting and Sculpture.

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Famous European Artists

Famous European Artists

Printed: 14.99 $eBook: 2.99 $

AUTHOR OF "POOR BOYS WHO BECAME FAMOUS," "GIRLS WHO BECAME FAMOUS," "STORIES FROM LIFE," "FAMOUS AMERICAN AUTHORS," "FAMOUS AMERICAN STATESMEN," "SOCIAL STUDIES IN
ENGLAND," "FROM HEART AND NATURE,"
"FAMOUS MEN OF SCIENCE," ETC.

"Do not act as if you had ten thousand years to throw away. Death stands at your elbow. Be good for something while you live, and it is in your power."
—Marcus Aurelius.

"Every line, every road, every gable, every tower, has some story of the past present in it. Every tocsin that sounds is a chronicle; every bridge that unites the two banks of the river, unites also the crowds of the living with the heroism of the dead.

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Eugene Delacroix

Eugene Delacroix

Printed: 17.99 $eBook: 4.99 $

Pour bien comprendre la portée de l'intervention et de l'influence de l'œuvre de Delacroix dans l'école française, il est nécessaire de se rappeler la situation exacte de la peinture au moment où il parut.

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Crayon Portraiture

Crayon Portraiture

Printed: 19.99 $eBook: 4.99 $
Author:
Series: Yellow Line Art Books, Book 0
Genres: Academics, Art Books

Complete Instructions for Making Crayon
Portraits on Crayon Paper and on
Platinum, Silver and Bromide
Enlargements

ALSO DIRECTIONS FOR THE USE OF
“TRANSPARENT LIQUID WATER COLORS”, "THEORY OF COLORS"
AND FOR MAKING
“FRENCH CRYSTALS”

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Free-Hand Drawing

Free-Hand Drawing

Printed: 12.99 $eBook: 3.99 $

DRAWING is the expression of an idea: “Art must come from within, and not from without. This fact has led some to assert that the study of nature is not essential to the student, and that careful training in the study of the representation of the actual appearance is mechanical and harmful. Such persons forget that all art ideas and sentiments must be based upon natural objects, and that a person who cannot represent truly what he sees will be entirely unable to express the simplest ideal conceptions so that others may appreciate them. Study of nature is, then, of the first and greatest importance to the art student.

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Artistic Anatomy of Animals

Artistic Anatomy of Animals

Printed: 24.99 $eBook: 4.99 $

A few lines will suffice to explain why we have compiled the present volume, to what wants it responds, and what its sphere of usefulness may possibly embrace.

In our teaching of plastic anatomy, especially at the École des Beaux-Arts—where, for the past nine years, we have had the very great honour of supplementing the teaching of our distinguished master

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Drawn at a Venture

Drawn at a Venture

Printed: 6.99 $eBook: 0.99 $
Author:
Series: Yellow Line Art Books, Book 0
Genres: Art Books, Non-Fiction

THERE are various methods of introducing an artist to his public. One of the best is to describe how you saved his life in the Bush in ’82; or he saved yours; and then you go on: “Little did either of us anticipate in those far-off days that Fougasse was destined to become . . .” Another way is to leave Fougasse out altogether, and concentrate, how happily, on your own theories of black-and-white drawing, or politics, or the decline of the churches; after all, an introduction doesn’t last long, and he has the rest of the book to himself. Perhaps, however, it is kinder to keep the last paragraph for him: “Take these little sketches by Fougasse, for instance . . .” and the reader, if he cares to any longer, can then turn over and take them. Left to ourselves, that is the method we should adopt. But the publisher is at our elbow. “This is an introduction,” he says. “For Heaven’s sake introduce the fellow.”

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