Mathematics & Geometry
First Course in the Theory of Equations

First Course in the Theory of Equations

Printed: 16.99 $

The theory of equations is not only a necessity in the subsequent mathematical courses and their applications, but furnishes an illuminating sequel to geometry, algebra and analytic geometry. Moreover, it develops anew and in greater detail various fundamental ideas of calculus for the simple, but important, case of polynomials. The theory of equations therefore affords a useful supplement to differential calculus whether taken subsequently or simultaneously.

It was to meet the numerous needs of the student in regard to his earlier and future mathematical courses that the present book was planned with great care and after wide consultation. It differs essentially from the author’s Elementary Theory of Equations, both in regard to omissions and additions, and since it is addressed to younger students and may be used parallel with a course in differential calculus. Simpler and more detailed proofs are now employed. The exercises are simpler, more numerous, of greater variety, and involve more practical applications.

More info →
Buy now!
The Pythagorean Triangle

The Pythagorean Triangle

Printed: 14.99 $

The three fixed lights, or windows, subsequently exchanged for our lesser luminaries, were explained one hundred and fifty years ago to signify " the three Persons, Father, Son, Holy Ghost ; " and were used to find out the meridian, " when the sun leaves the south, and breaks in at the west window of the Lodge." While the " mossy bed," the ancient signs of disgust and recognition, as well as the primitive name of a Master Mason, are equally obscure at the present day; having been swept away, along with the original method of characterising chemical bodies by symbols, as being no longer necessary to the system.

More info →
Buy now!
History of Modern Mathematics

History of Modern Mathematics

Printed: 12.99 $

This little work was published as a chapter in Merriman and Woodward’s Higher Mathematics. It was written before the numerous surveys of the development of science in the past hundred years, which appeared at the close of the nineteenth century, and it therefore had more reason for being then than now, save as it can now call attention, to these later contributions. The conditions under which it was published limited it to such a small compass that it could do no more than present a list of the most prominent names in connection with a few important topics. Since it is necessary to use the same plates in this edition, simply adding a few new pages, the body of the work remains substantially as it first appeared. The book therefore makes no claim to being history, but stands simply as an outline of the prominent movements in mathematics, presenting a few of the leading names, and calling attention to some of the bibliography of the subject.

More info →
Buy now!
Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy

Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy

Printed: 14.99 $

This book is intended essentially as an "Introduction" and does not aim at giving an exhaustive discussion of the problems with which it deals. It seemed desirable to set forth certain results, hitherto only available to those who have mastered logical symbolism, in a form offering the minimum of difficulty to the beginner. The utmost endeavour has been made to avoid dogmatism on such questions as are still open to serious doubt, and this endeavour has to some extent dominated the choice of topics considered.
The beginnings of mathematical logic are less deffinitely known than its later portions, but are of at leastequal philosophical interest. Much of what is set forth in the following chapters is not properly to be called "philosophy" though the matters concerned were included in philosophy so long as no satisfactory science of them existed.

The nature of infinity and continuity, for example, belonged in former days to philosophy, but belongs now to mathematics. Mathematical philosophy, in the strict sense, cannot, perhaps, be held to include such definite scientific results as have been obtained in this region; the philosophy of mathematics will naturally be expected to deal with questions on the frontier of knowledge, as to which comparative certainty is not yet attained.

More info →
Buy now!
Mathematical Geography

Mathematical Geography

Printed: 14.99 $

In the greatly awakened interest in the common-school subjects during recent years, geography has received a large share. The establishment of chairs of geography in some of our greatest universities, the giving of college courses in physiography, meteorology, and commerce, and the general extension of geography courses in normal schools, academies, and high schools, may be cited as evidence of this growing appreciation of the importance of the subject.

While physiographic processes and resulting land forms occupy a large place in geographical control, the earth in its simple mathematical aspects should be better understood than it generally is, and mathematical geography deserves a larger place in the literature of the subject than the few pages generally given to it in our physical geographies and elementary astronomies.

More info →
Buy now!
Philosophy and Fun of Algebra

Philosophy and Fun of Algebra

Printed: 9.99 $

My Dear Children,
A young monkey named Genius picked a green walnut, and bit, through a bitter rind, down into a hard shell. He then threw the walnut away, saying:

“How stupid people are! They told me walnuts are good to eat.” His grandmother, whose name was Wisdom, picked up the walnut—peeled off the rind with her fingers, cracked the shell, and shared the kernel with her grandson, saying: “Those get on best in life who do not trust to first impressions.” In some old books the story is told differently; the grandmother is called Mrs Cunning-Greed, and she eats all the kernel herself. Fables about the Cunning-Greed family are written to make children laugh. It is good for you to laugh; it makes you grow strong, and gives you the habit of understanding jokes and not being made miserable by them. But take care not to believe such fables; because, if you believe them, they give you bad dreams.

MARY EVEREST BOOLE.

More info →
Buy now!
Plane Geometry

Plane Geometry

Printed: 16.99 $

It is intended to have the first sixteen pages of this book simply read in the class, with such running comment and discussion as may be useful to help the beginner catch the spirit of the subject-matter, and not leave him to the mere letter of dry definitions. In like manner, the definitions at the beginning of each Book should be read and discussed in the recitation room.

There is a decided advantage in having the de_nitions for each Book in a single group so that they can be included in one survey and discussion. For a similar reason the theorems of limits are considered together. The subject of limits is exceedingly interesting in itself, and it was thought best to include in the theory of limits in the second Book every principle required for Plane and Solid Geometry.

More info →
Buy now!
Solid Geometry with Problems and Applications

Solid Geometry with Problems and Applications

Printed: 14.99 $

In re-writing the Solid Geometry the authors have consistently carried out the distinctive features described in the preface of the Plane Geometry. Mention is here made only of certain matters which are particularly emphasized in the Solid Geometry.

Owing to the greater maturity of the pupils it has been possible to make the logical structure of the Solid Geometry more prominent than in the Plane Geometry. The axioms are stated and applied at the precise points where they are to be used. Theorems are no longer quoted in the proofs but are only referred to by paragraph numbers; while with increasing frequency the student is left to his own devices in supplying the reasons and even in filling in the logical steps of the argument. For convenience of reference the axioms and theorems of plane geometry which are used in the Solid Geometry are collected in the Introduction.

More info →
Buy now!
Spherical Trigonometry: “For the Use of Colleges and Schools”

Spherical Trigonometry: “For the Use of Colleges and Schools”

Printed: 14.99 $

The present work is constructed on the same plan as my treatise on Plane Trigonometry, to which it is intended as a sequel; it contains all the propositions usually included under the head of Spherical Trigonometry, together with a large collection of examples for exercise. In the course of the work reference is made to preceding writers from whom assistance has been obtained; besides these writers I have consulted the treatises on Trigonometry by Lardner, Lefebure de Fourcy, and Snowball, and the treatise on Geometry published in the Library of Useful Knowledge. The examples have been chiefly selected from the University and College Examination Papers.

In the account of Napier’s Rules of Circular Parts an explanation has been given of a method of proof devised by Napier, which seems to have been overlooked by most modern writers on the subject. I have had the advantage of access to an unprinted Memoir on this point by the late R. L. Ellis of Trinity College; Mr Ellis had in fact rediscovered for himself Napier’s own method. For the use of this Memoir and for some valuable references on the subject I am indebted to the Dean of Ely.Considerable labour has been bestowed on the text in order to render it comprehensive and accurate, and the examples have all been carefully verified; and thus I venture to hope that the work will be found useful by Students and Teachers.

More info →
Buy now!
The Foundations of Geometry

The Foundations of Geometry

Printed: 11.99 $

The material contained in the following translation was given in substance by Professor Hilbert as a course of lectures on euclidean geometry at the University of G¨ottingen during the winter semester of 1898–1899. The results of his investigation were re-arranged and put into the form in which they appear here as a memorial address published in connection with the celebration at the unveiling of the Gauss-Weber monument at G¨ottingen, in June, 1899. In the French edition, which appeared soon after, Professor Hilbert made some additions, particularly in the concluding remarks, where he gave an account of the results of a recent investigation made by Dr. Dehn.

More info →
Buy now!