Mathematics & Geometry
Calculus Made Easy

Calculus Made Easy

Printed: 14.99 $

Considering how many fools can calculate, it is surprising that it should be thought either a difficult or a tedious task for any other fool to learn how to master the same tricks. Some calculus-tricks are quite easy. Some are enormously difficult. The fools who write the textbooks of advanced mathematics and they are mostly clever fools|seldom take the trouble to show you how easy the easy calculations are. On the contrary, they seem to desire to impress you with their tremendous cleverness by going about it in the most difficult way. Being myself a remarkably stupid fellow, I have had to unteach myself the difficulties, and now beg to present to my fellow fools the parts that are not hard. Master these thoroughly, and the rest will follow. What one fool can do, another can.

More info →
Buy now!
The Philosophy of Mathematics

The Philosophy of Mathematics

Printed: 12.99 $eBook: 4.99 $

In The philosophy of mathematics, mathematics employee classification efforts to understand the philosophy is the branch.

More info →
Buy now!
Elements of Plane Trigonometry

Elements of Plane Trigonometry

Printed: 14.99 $

Trigonometry (from "trigwnon", triangle, and "metrew") is the science of the numerical relations between the sides and angles of triangles.

This Treatise is intended to demonstrate, to those who have learned the principal propositions in the first six books of Euclid, so much of Trigonometry as was originally implied in the term, that is, how from given values of some of the sides and angles of a triangle to calculate, in the most convenient way, all the others. A few propositions supplementary to Euclid are premised as introductory to the propositions of Trigonometry as usually understood.

More info →
Buy now!
The Way To Geometry

The Way To Geometry

Printed: 19.99 $eBook: 3.99 $

Plato saith “tov peov akei gewmetreiv”, That "God doth alwayes worke by Geometry", that is, as the wiseman doth interprete it, Sap. XI. 21. Omnia in mensura & numero & pondere disponere. Dispose all things by measure, and number, and weight: Or, as the learned Plutarch speaketh; He adorneth and layeth out all the parts of the world according to ra-te, proportion, and similitude.

More info →
Buy now!
First Course in the Theory of Equations

First Course in the Theory of Equations

Printed: 16.99 $

The theory of equations is not only a necessity in the subsequent mathematical courses and their applications, but furnishes an illuminating sequel to geometry, algebra and analytic geometry. Moreover, it develops anew and in greater detail various fundamental ideas of calculus for the simple, but important, case of polynomials. The theory of equations therefore affords a useful supplement to differential calculus whether taken subsequently or simultaneously.

It was to meet the numerous needs of the student in regard to his earlier and future mathematical courses that the present book was planned with great care and after wide consultation. It differs essentially from the author’s Elementary Theory of Equations, both in regard to omissions and additions, and since it is addressed to younger students and may be used parallel with a course in differential calculus. Simpler and more detailed proofs are now employed. The exercises are simpler, more numerous, of greater variety, and involve more practical applications.

More info →
Buy now!
The Pythagorean Triangle

The Pythagorean Triangle

Printed: 14.99 $

The three fixed lights, or windows, subsequently exchanged for our lesser luminaries, were explained one hundred and fifty years ago to signify " the three Persons, Father, Son, Holy Ghost ; " and were used to find out the meridian, " when the sun leaves the south, and breaks in at the west window of the Lodge." While the " mossy bed," the ancient signs of disgust and recognition, as well as the primitive name of a Master Mason, are equally obscure at the present day; having been swept away, along with the original method of characterising chemical bodies by symbols, as being no longer necessary to the system.

More info →
Buy now!
History of Modern Mathematics

History of Modern Mathematics

Printed: 12.99 $

This little work was published as a chapter in Merriman and Woodward’s Higher Mathematics. It was written before the numerous surveys of the development of science in the past hundred years, which appeared at the close of the nineteenth century, and it therefore had more reason for being then than now, save as it can now call attention, to these later contributions. The conditions under which it was published limited it to such a small compass that it could do no more than present a list of the most prominent names in connection with a few important topics. Since it is necessary to use the same plates in this edition, simply adding a few new pages, the body of the work remains substantially as it first appeared. The book therefore makes no claim to being history, but stands simply as an outline of the prominent movements in mathematics, presenting a few of the leading names, and calling attention to some of the bibliography of the subject.

More info →
Buy now!
Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy

Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy

Printed: 14.99 $

This book is intended essentially as an "Introduction" and does not aim at giving an exhaustive discussion of the problems with which it deals. It seemed desirable to set forth certain results, hitherto only available to those who have mastered logical symbolism, in a form offering the minimum of difficulty to the beginner. The utmost endeavour has been made to avoid dogmatism on such questions as are still open to serious doubt, and this endeavour has to some extent dominated the choice of topics considered.
The beginnings of mathematical logic are less deffinitely known than its later portions, but are of at leastequal philosophical interest. Much of what is set forth in the following chapters is not properly to be called "philosophy" though the matters concerned were included in philosophy so long as no satisfactory science of them existed.

The nature of infinity and continuity, for example, belonged in former days to philosophy, but belongs now to mathematics. Mathematical philosophy, in the strict sense, cannot, perhaps, be held to include such definite scientific results as have been obtained in this region; the philosophy of mathematics will naturally be expected to deal with questions on the frontier of knowledge, as to which comparative certainty is not yet attained.

More info →
Buy now!
Mathematical Geography

Mathematical Geography

Printed: 14.99 $

In the greatly awakened interest in the common-school subjects during recent years, geography has received a large share. The establishment of chairs of geography in some of our greatest universities, the giving of college courses in physiography, meteorology, and commerce, and the general extension of geography courses in normal schools, academies, and high schools, may be cited as evidence of this growing appreciation of the importance of the subject.

While physiographic processes and resulting land forms occupy a large place in geographical control, the earth in its simple mathematical aspects should be better understood than it generally is, and mathematical geography deserves a larger place in the literature of the subject than the few pages generally given to it in our physical geographies and elementary astronomies.

More info →
Buy now!
Philosophy and Fun of Algebra

Philosophy and Fun of Algebra

Printed: 9.99 $

My Dear Children,
A young monkey named Genius picked a green walnut, and bit, through a bitter rind, down into a hard shell. He then threw the walnut away, saying:

“How stupid people are! They told me walnuts are good to eat.” His grandmother, whose name was Wisdom, picked up the walnut—peeled off the rind with her fingers, cracked the shell, and shared the kernel with her grandson, saying: “Those get on best in life who do not trust to first impressions.” In some old books the story is told differently; the grandmother is called Mrs Cunning-Greed, and she eats all the kernel herself. Fables about the Cunning-Greed family are written to make children laugh. It is good for you to laugh; it makes you grow strong, and gives you the habit of understanding jokes and not being made miserable by them. But take care not to believe such fables; because, if you believe them, they give you bad dreams.

MARY EVEREST BOOLE.

More info →
Buy now!